Green River Carnegie Library

By AHW Staff

October 2, 2017

In October 1895, a library was established in Green River and was located on the first floor of the school (now the Masonic Temple), through the efforts of Robert C. Morris and T.S. Taliaferro, Jr. Green River received a $20,000 Carnegie Public Library Building grant in December of 1905. Noted Wyoming architect William Dubois designed the building, and the library was dedicated on Independence Day in 1907, with 500 citizens attending the ceremonies. The first county librarian was Elizabeth Moriarty and she served until World War I. Her starting wage was $10 per year.  When the library celebrated its 50th anniversary on July 4, 1957, they had one employee who worked there the entire 50 years, custodian William Hutton, Jr. 

Green River's Carnegie library features a bold Classical Revival style that was popular in the United States in the early 20th century.

Green River's Carnegie library features a bold Classical Revival style that was popular in the United States in the early 20th century.

When Green River’s new Sweetwater County Library opened in 1980 the Carnegie building was used to house the county circuit court, but it is now vacant and its future is uncertain. It is included in the Green River Commercial District on the National Register of Historic Places. 

 
green river carnegie.jpg
 
 

Come see our traveling Cowboy Carnegies exhibit at the Sweetwater County Library in Green River. It will be on display at the library from September 8th through October 29th. There will be a free public talk on Tuesday, October 3rd. Come learn more about Green River's Carnegie library and other Carnegies around the state.

 

LIKE WHAT YOU JUST READ? 

  • Browse our archive of Historic Places and Spaces Profiles by clicking here.
  • To learn about all of our campaigns and initiatives, click here.
  • Subscribe to our newsletter to learn more about what's going on in Wyoming.
  • Donate or become a member to help us produce stories, organize events, and be a voice for preservation across the state.
  • Like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter and Instagram to see our latest updates!